Seizures Among Kids

Have you ever wondered what actually happens in a kid’s brain during a seizure attack? Well, imagine this. Your kid’s brain and yours have billions and billions of neurons (nerve cells). These neurons all try to talk to each other through what they call “electrical impulses.” A seizure attack happens when a sudden surge of electrical impulses is produced in one big blow. This abnormal surge of electrical impulse turns the brain haywire which sometimes leads to a seizure attack. When a seizure attack happens, your kid temporarily loses consciousness, have spasms, uncontrollable muscle contractions, and more.

Sadly, a large number of epileptic cases is composed of kids all over the world (Shafer, et al., 2013). There is really no specific cause for this significant number, but there are a lot of factors that point out why. For example, kids are prone to injuries like head trauma. Due to their uncoordinated and still-developing bodies, they can easily injure themselves. A kid falling in a monkey bar can have a possible head trauma that can cause epilepsy. However, in most cases, the development of epilepsy is idiopathic. Meaning, the cause of why it developed in the first place is unknown.

How CBD Oil Help Seizures?

Studies tell us that several compounds found in CBD oil have an anticonvulsant effect (Devinsky, et al., 2016). Meaning, CBD oil can reduce the intensity and frequency of seizure attacks. Another thing which makes CBD oil an ideal treatment for seizure is its power to prevent the damage of the neurons. The imminent damage of neurons can trigger a seizure attack.

There is a remarkable anecdotal report in the Journal of the American Medical Association, which dates back in 1975 about epilepsy and CBD oil (N.A, 2015). A 24-year old patient completely controlled his seizure attacks by utilizing marijuana. This marijuana administration is low in THC content but high in CBD content. Before using CBD, he experiences bouts of attack once every month. Now, he is completely free from the attacks in years.

Another research founded in 1980 showed remarkable results, too (JM, C. et al., N.D). Patients with different spectrums of epilepsy controlled their seizure attacks by adding CBD oil to their current epileptic medication. The side effects rendered were from zero to tolerable. Most of the recorded side effects were sleepiness and tiredness.

Is Cannabis Oil Safe for Kids?

The first thing that we have to rule out about cannabis oil is its alleged ability to make a person high. This is not true. CBD oil is a medicinal oil and very different from recreational marijuana. CBD oil does not have a significant amount of THC to make your child high. CBD oil is not physically addictive too.

If you are still worried that CBD oil might not be safe for your child, try to talk to somebody that is knowledgeable about the topic. Talk to your child’s doctor or to a pediatric neurologist. Talking to a professional is the best way to know for sure that CBD oil is safe for your kids. They are the ones who know whether the CBD oil medication interacts badly with your child’s current medication or medical condition.

Final Thought         

It’s time to start looking for natural alternatives for your child’s epilepsy. A good number of epileptic children are getting resistant to synthetic medication nowadays. Try CBD oil. Who knows, this might help control your child’s epileptic symptoms.

References:

Shafer, P. et al. (2013) Epilepsy Statistics. Available at:
https://www.epilepsy.com/learn/about-epilepsy-basics/epilepsy-statistics

Devinsky, O. et al. (2016) Cannabidiol: Pharmacology and potential therapeutic role in epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Available at:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4707667/

N.A. (2015) How Does CBD Oil Help With Seizures and Epilepsy? Available at:
https://www.cbdoilbenefits.com/how-does-cbd-oil-help-with-seizures-and-epilepsy.html/

JM, C. et al. (N.D) Chronic administration of cannabidiol to healthy volunteers and epileptic patients. Available at:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7413719